The 1700 Bird Family  IT'S ABOUT TIME Vol. 2

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH NOTES RECORDED WHILE RESEARCHING THE PATERNAL ANCESTORS, DESCENDANTS, AND COLLATERAL LINES, OF DAVID WILLIAM BIRD (1901- ) Including the families of   BIRD, BYRD, BIRT, BORDT, CALLAHAN, CURRY, DIEFENBACH, DYER, HULL, HOHL, KEISTER, KIESTER,  RIDER, RYDER, RADER, READER, STEUART, STEWART, USHER, WENDEROTH, WINTEROTT

Compiled by: BILL DECOURSEY    decoursey@earthlink   1735 - 19th Terrace NW   New Brighton, MN 55112   (612)-633-5759  

1700's "Charles Stuart gave a grant on the James River to William BYRD. A later BYRD left the Tidewater and came to the Valley because of an overzealous support of Lord Dunmore." Davis, THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY TOUR III , p.351.

1704 - The roll of Quit Rents of Virginia in 1704 lists: Robert BIRD of King and Queen county; Widdo BIRD of Essex county; William BIRD of King William County; and William BIRD of King and Queen County, Va. See also THE CENTURY MAGAZINE "Colonel William Byrd of Westover", v.XLII (New Series v.XX June 1891), pp.163-178.

1704 - Mary RYDER appears on the James City County, Virginia   Quit Rent Rolls in 1704. VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY , v.31,p.160.

1704c- In the Dutch Reformed Church Records of Sommerset Co., New Jersey Andreis BORDT (BIRD) and wife, --- KOEVERS, baptized children, Katryn 1704; Mary 1704; Borgon 1707, and Abraham 1710. Andreis' wife may have been the Catherine BIRD mentioned in the will of John COVERT. See BOSTON TRANSCRIPT , 11 Oct 1934. See also Theodore Chambers, EARLY GERMANS OF NEW JERSEY , pp.265-266.

1704 - Johann Martin DIEFENBACH, son of Heinrich DIEFENBACH, was married 22 July 1704, at Schmittweiler, Germany to Anna Elisabeth SPIESS, daughter of Johannes SPEISS. Her father, Johannes SPEISS, who died before his daughter's wedding, had been a forester and gamekeeper for Baron Von SICKINGEN of Ebernberg, Pfalz.

1705 - Johan Caspar WENDEROTH (1705-1777c.), son of Johan Jacob and Anna Margaretha WENDEROTH, was bapt. 11 Dec. 1705, at Bammental, West Germany. He married, 1732, to Margaretha STREP. Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.viii.

1706 - Heinrich DIEFENBACH (1633-1706) died, 25 Jan 1706, at Schmittweiler, Pfalz, Germany.

1706c- Peter Thomas HULL, son of Johannes and Anna Christine HOHL, was born, ca.1706, in Bad Kreuznach, Pfalz, in the Palatinate.

1713 - Thomas BIRD bought 100 acres on Red Clay creek, New Castle County, Delaware, Oct 29, 1713. Thomas and Sarah BIRD had Elizabeth, born 15 Sept. 1718; baptized in old Swedes church 8 Dec 1718. Thomas BIRD of Cecil County, Md., died about 1741, where his estate was inventoried. In Chester county, Pa., there were the following: William BIRD, Upper Providence, 1720; John BIRD, Darby, 1721; Thomas BIRD, Springfield, 1722. Joseph BIRD, Kennet, 1732. Egle, William Henry, NOTES AND QUERIES , (1893) 4th series, v.I, p.134. See also Theodore Chambers, EARLY GERMANS OF NEW JERSEY , pp.265-266.

1716 - Kaspar DIFFENBACH, son of Master Baker Johannes DIEFFENBACH of Bad Liebenzell Germany, was born, 1690, and on 19 Nov 1716 married first, Eva Catharine PFEIL, born 18 Sept. 1694. She died on 7 Sept. 1733, at Graben, and he married second to Sabrina WEBER. Caspar landed at Philadelphia, 13 Aug 1750, on the ship "Edinburgh". He first settled in Lampeter Twp., Lancaster Co., Penna. and then moved with his family to Colrain Twp., Bedford Co., Penna. Information from Ray Dieffenbach of Elizabethtown, Penna. (1975).

1718 - Another Kasper DIEFFENBACK, was born, 22 Sept. 1718, in Grabien, Germany. This probably was the one that married Catharine MISCHLER.

1720c- "Edward USHER eloped with the daughter of an English nobleman named PERRY and came to America. Their four children were daughters, one dying in infancy. USHER died while they were yet small, and the widow went to England, hoping for a reconciliation with her father. He recognized her on the road as he drove by in his carriage, but being still angry he tossed her a shilling, telling her that was all she would have from him and that she must mind her brats herself. She returned to America, her children, if not also herself, finding their way to the Augusta colony, probably to Fort Dickenson. James KNOX became the guardian of Ann Jane USHER, and with a portion, at least, of her inheritance he purchased for her a negro girl. Several years later she married Loftus PULLIN. One sister (Margaret) married William STEUART, the third (Martha?) marrying (John DICKENSON) a son of Captain Adam DICKENSON. The stern parent finally relented and provided for his daughter by will. But the search he instituted failed to discover her, and no knowledge thereof coming to her descendants for many years, the matter went by default." Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.69. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.201.

1722 - John STUART and Mary BOWMAN were married, 1722, at Henrico County, Virginia.

1722 - Benjamin HARRISON, of Berkeley, Charles City Co., Virginia, married 1722, to Ann CARTER, dau. of Col. Robert and Judith (ARMSTEAD) CARTER. Benjamin HARRISON was a member of the House of Burgesses. He died 1744/45. Weis, Frederick Lewis, THE MAGNA CHARTA SURETIES, 1215 (3rd edition 1979); Lineage #88, p.62.

1722 - Richard CALLAHAN and Elizabeth NUTTER were married, 31 March 1722, at Middlesex Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.12, p.2.

1723 - In 1723 there is recorded the administration of the estate of Andrew BIRD of Millstone, Somerset County, New Jersey. His wife's name was Mary.

1724 - Mathew JORDAN and Susannah BIRD were married, 1724, Isle of Wight County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.25, p.16.

1725 - Susanna Margaretha DIEFFENBACH, daughter of Johann Martin and Elizabeth (SPIESS) DIEFFENBACH, was born in October, 1725, at Meisenheim, Germany. She married, 25 Nov. 1750 at Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, to Peter Thomas HOHL (HULL).

1725 - A battle was fought in Shawneese country near Franklin, Virginia, about 1725, between the Delewares from the north and the Catawba from the south in which the Delawares were defeated. Accompanying the Delawares on this excursion was a New York trader and adventurer, Jon VanMETER, the first white man to enter Pendleton, County, Virginia.

1726 - Archibald STEUART "a native of Ireland, having been engaged in some disturbance in his native country, fled to America, leaving his family behind. After living in Pennsylvania for some time, he was relieved by a general amnesty, and sending for his family came with them to Augusta (then Orange County, Virginia) in 1738. His wife was Janet BROWN (m.1726), a sister of the Rev. John BROWN, of New Providence. He died in 1759." Archibald STEUART had brothers John and David. He left issue: Thomas; Eleanor; Alexander; and Benjamin. See Waddell, ANNALS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.366-379,192; Payton, J. Lewis, HISTORY OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.308-310; Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF ROCKBRIDGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.532-533.

1727 - "In 1727, a year before the first permanent settlement in Rockingham, and five years before there was anyone at or near where the city of Staunton grew up, we find an attempt to colonize the Cowpasture Valley." In that year Robert and William LEWIS, William LYNN, Robert BROOKE, and Beverley ROBINSON petitioned the Governor of Virginia to take up 50,000 acres of land "on the head branches of James River to the West and Northwestward of the Cow Pasture, on seating thereon one family for every Thousand Acres" within six years. - Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1911 - reprinted 1979), p.61.

1728c- Peter Thomas HULL married first in Desloch, Palatinate, Germany, ca.1728. His first wife died in Pfalz, Germany. He had at least two sons by this marriage: Peter HULL (1730-1818) married Barbara KEITH; and Franz Philip HULL married (1) Maria Agnes KLINGIN(GER), married (2), 1771, Margaret LINKENFELTER.

1728 - A Hans Michael RIDER came from Rotterdam to Philadelphia in 1728 on the ship "James Goodwill".

1728 - Andrew BIRD married, before 1728, to Magdalene JONES, daughter of Mounce and Ingeborg (YOCUM) JONES. Andrew and Magdalene (Jones) BIRD probably had children: John BIRD (ca.1729-1819), m.1767, Margaret Susanna WINTERODE; Andrew BYRD, Jr. (ca.1730-1799) m. Mary --?--; Rebecca BIRD, born 6 July 1732, bapt. 8 June 1737; Mounce BIRD (1735-1793) m. Clara RUDDEL; Abraham BIRD (ca.1737-1820), m.1757, Rachel   ZEIGLER and removed to Fayette Co., Kentucky; and possibly others.

"The families of John RUDDELL and Andrew BIRD were neighbors in Augusta Co., VA., and witnessed each others' documents. Mounce BIRD married Clara RUDDELL, John RUDDELL's daughter; and John named them in his will. It is probable that John RUDDELL's sons, Cornelius, Stephen and George married respectively, Ingabo, Mary, and Magdelene BIRD, daughters of Andrew, and that Andrew BIRD's son, Amos BIRD married Sarah RUDDELL, dau. of John. Andrew BIRD, according to Wayland, was son of Abraham BIRD of Calvert Co., Md., and was not related to the prominent William BYRD family of Virginia. The Rev. Twyman WILLIAMS, late of Hampden-Sydney, a descendant of Andrew BIRD, did considerable research on the family and planned to publish a BIRD genealogy, but died before he accomplished that. I understand that he furnished the BIRD data for Wayland's HISTORY OF SHENANDOAH COUNTY .

--- Many of the Shenandoah Valley settlers were English and Scotch-Irish from Penna., Maryland and Delaware who were seeking cheaper land as the western parts of Virginia and the Carolinas opened up for settlement. John RUDDELL came about 1745 from Chester Co., Penna., and there is a possibility that Andrew BIRD, too, may have come from Penna." - Info from Harold T. SMUTZ of Webster Groves, MO. (1976).

1729 - Thomas FRENCH and Mary CALLAHAN were married, 20 Jan. 1729, at Middlesex County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.11, p.8.

1729c. The first ancestor of our line which we can determine with certainty was John BIRD (1729c-1819). He was born about 1729, probably near Winchester (Frederickstown), Virginia, or in Chester Co., Penna. He probably was a son of Andrew and Magdeline (JONES) BIRD and a brother to Andrew, Abraham, and Mounce BIRD of Shenandoah County.

1730 - Hugh STUART and Judith MACHEN were married, 29 Jan. 1730, Middlesex Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.16, p.18.

1730 "Lutheran records show that, in 1730, Johannes HOHL, of Paltz, Germany, had a wife, two sons, Johann Tobias HOHL and Peter Tomas HOHL, and an unnamed daughter." - THE HFA JOURNAL (Hull Family Association, August 1990), v.1, No.2, pp.1-10.

1730 - Frederick KEISTER (1730-1815) is believed to have been born in the Palatinate part of the Rhine Valley, near Staasbourgh, Germany, about 1730.

1730c. Andrew BYRD, Jr., son of Andrew and Magdalene (JONES) BIRD, was born about 1730. He married Mary -----. He died, 20 Jan 1799.

1730 - William RIDER (1730c.-1819) was born about 1730.

1730 - "Several years prior to the settlement of any portion of the Virginia Shenandoah Valley by the white man, a 'Dutchman' from New York, by the name of John VANMETER, accompanied a war party of the Delaware Indians on one of their excursions southward against their inveterate enemies the Catawbas. Near or upon the present site of Franklin, the county seat of Pendleton Co., West Virginia, a fierce battle was fought, in which the Delawares were worsted and driven back. VANMETER took part in the battle and escaped afterward with the defeated braves; and although he was on the losing side in this venture, he at once set about, with true German instinct, to turn his ill-starred trip to good account. He had seen the fertile bottom lands, all unoccupied, along the Shenandoah and the South Branch of the Potomac; he made application to Governor GOOCH for a grant of land, and obtained 40,000 acres in the lower part of the Valley. It was VANMETER's grant that Joist HITE purchased in 1732, when he and his party settled on the Opequon River." John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE (May 1902), v.X, pp.35-36; A. D. Lough, "An account of the Indian Massacre at Fort Seybert" (Franklin, Virginia Newspaper Article, ca.1920s).

"The first permanent settlements on the Virginia or Shenandoah Valley seem to have been made by German emigrants from Pennsylvania who established the town of New Mecklenburg (now Shepherdstown, in Jefferson County, about 1726-28.

Many of these settlers afterwards purchased titles to their lands from Richard MORGAN, a Welshman, who obtained a grant for a large tract in the same vicinity in 1734. About that time, Alexander ROSS, a Pennsylvania Quaker, of Scottish descent, obtained a grant of forty thousand acres from Governor GOOCH. He located his land north, west, and south of the site of the present town of Winchester.

"John and Isaac VANMETER, of Pennsylvania, obtained a grant of forty thousand acres from Governor GOOCH in 1730, to be located in the lower Shenandoah Valley, within the present counties of Frederick, Clarke, and Jefferson.

This warrant was sold by the grantees in 1731 to Joist HITE, a Hollander, who removed from Pennsylvania in 1732 with his own and fifteen other families, most of them Scotch-Irish. They settled along Opequon, Cedar and Crooked creeks, in what is now Frederick County." Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, pp.44-50.

1730 - "St Josephs" or the "Hill Church" was established at Oley (Friedensburg), Berks Co., Pennsylvania, by John Caspar STOEVER, in 1730. It was one of the ten charter member congregations of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, and among the oldest churches in Pennsylvania.

1731 - Abraham BYRD, son of Andrew and Magdelene (JONES) BIRD, was born about 1731. He married first to Catherine ---, and married 2nd, 1757, to Rachel ZEIGLER, widow of William FRY. He was a member of the house of Burgess in 1775 and a member of the Assembly in 1778. He died, 1820, in Fayette Co., KENTUCKY.

1732 - Johan Caspar WENDEROTH married, 16 January 1732, at Meckesheim, West Germany, to Margaretha STREP. Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.viii.

1732 - "We quote from another historian as given in the SEMI-CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA by James Morton Callahan. in his chapter on 'Evolution of Settlements' page sixteen, he speaks of the early German Settlement in the lower Shenandoah and near Winchester, mentioning among others Joist HITE who settled in the region mentioned in 1732 and mentioned his legal difficulties with Lord FAIRFAX who had a large land survey covering much of the territory of Virginia and later West Virginia as drained by the waters of the Potomac. This dispute was such as to make land titles insecure, especially for German people.

This led to the emigration of many of the German people to southwest Virginia. We quote:---'Several German immigrants, induced by insecurity of titles in the lower Shenandoah, crossed the Alleghenies, built cabins in the New, the Greenbrier and the Kanawha valleys.' This lawsuit was in the year 1736. This sounds as though the Germans joined the caravan of German immigrants who were moving up the Shenandoah Valley toward New River about 1738 and 1740." Rev. Ulysses S. A. Heavener, GERMAN NEW RIVER SETTLEMENT: VIRGINIA (1976-Reprint), p.16.

1732 - Prior to about 1735, the settlements on the Monocacy River (near the present sit of Frederick) were the westernmost habitations in Maryland. Only ten miles east of the Blue Ridge foothills and directly in the path of westward movement, there were about a half-dozen families settled along the Monocacy by 1732. The settlement grew rapidly; the town of Frederick was laid out in 1745 and the new county of Frederick was created from Prince George County three years later in 1748. The first extant statement concerning the Reformed Congregation at Frederick is that of a minister who visited in 1747, baptizing twenty-six children and organizing support from forty-nine heads of families. In 1767 the Reformed Congregation wrote (in German) a church constitution signed by the members of the community, and among the eighty-nine heads of families is the name "WINTEROTT". - From an outline by Dr. Lyle M. Blackwell of Gauley Bridge, West Virginia.

1732 - "In 1732 Yost HEIT (Joist HITE) came from York, Penna. bringing with him his three sons-in-law and others, and settled on the Opequon river, five miles south of where Winchester now stands. His homestead was upon the great Indian highway to the upper parts of the Valley, which highway was afterwards widened, macadamized and otherwise improved, and is now the well known Valley Turnpike.

Jacob CHRISMAN, one of HITE's sons-in-law, proceeded two miles further south on the same road, and settled at a spring, still known as Chrisman's Spring; George BAUMANN (BOWMAN), another son-in-law, located still further south, on Cedar creek; and the third, Paul FROHMANN (FROMAN), also settled on Cedar creek, several miles west of Bowman." From John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE (April 1902), v.IX, No.4, p.338-352; v.X, pp.33-48.

1732 - "The first settlement within the limits of Augusta County was made by John LEWIS, a refugee from justice, who had killed his landlord, an Irish nobleman. He came to Pennsylvania in 1731, where he was joined by his family.

They removed from Lancaster county to the Joist HITE settlement on the Opequon in 1732, and shortly after ascended the valley (which heads in southern Virginia) and located at a point one mile east of the site of Staunton." Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, pp.44-50.

1732 - "In 1732, a pioneer band of Scotch-Irish (from Ulster), under the leadership of John LEWIS, penetrated more than a hundred miles up the Valley and located in the cluster of hills where Staunton now stands. At least four years prior to this date, several German families had established themselves---by squatter's rights, we presume---in what is now the southeastern part of Rockingham county, near the present town of Elkton." From John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE (April 1902), v.IX, No.4, p.338-352; v.X, pp.33-48; also Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.26.

Col. John LEWIS, was of Scottish-Welsh descent, and came from Ireland. He died in 1762 at the age of 84. He had sons: Thomas LEWIS, the first Augusta County surveyor and member of the House of Burgesses; Andrew LEWIS, a surveyor and soldier; and Charles LEWIS, an Indian fighter who died at the battle of Point Pleasant. - Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.66; Patricia Burton, THE SECOND "COL. CHARLES LEWIS DAY" (1978), passim; Patricia Burton, VIRGINIA BEGINS TO REMEMBER (1980), passim.

1732 - Rebecca BIRD, born 6 July 1732, was baptized 8 Jun 1737, by Rev. John Casper STOEVER near what is now Shenandoah Co., Virginia. She was the daughter of Andrew BIRD and sister of Mounce, Abraham and Andrew BIRD of Shenandoah Co., Virginia.

"One of the prominent early settlers in the Shenandoah Valley was Jacob STAUFFER (STOEVER), who obtained a large grant of land that extended from the confluence of the two forks of the Shenandoah River southwestward along the main stream into what is now Page county, thus comprising portions of the present counties of Page, Warren and Shenandoah. It is related of STOVER that, in order to obtain his grant, he gave names to every horse, cow and pig that he possessed, and represented them as heads of families, ready to settle his land. He located near the northeast end of the Massanutten Mountain and founded there Stufferstadt, the present town of Strasburg. "Part of STOVER's grant was on what was then called 'Mesinetto creek,' in the present county of Page.  A settlement was established there that was known later as   the 'Masinutton settlement.' Today the site is preserved in the little town of Massanutten, on the Shenandoah River, about four miles south-west of Luray." From John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.X, pp.33-48.

1732 - A John BIRD married, 31 August 1732, at Middlesex Co., Virginia, to --?-- BURNET. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.17, p.2.

1732 - Johannes Casper WENDEROTH, sailed with his new bride (Margaretha STREP), from Rotterdam, Holland on board the ship "Pleasant", James MORRIS, Master, and arrived at Philadelphia, 30 September 1732. Captain MORRIS in his list of passengers showed 150 men, women, and children on board. Upon arrival, one-fourth of the 57 men over 16 were listed as sick; one had died at sea. On 11 Oct 1732, at age 28, Johan CASPAR WENDEROTH signed an oath of allegiance to the English King George II. He settled at Fredericksburg, Md. (formerly in Prince George Co., now in what is Frederick Co., Md. This is part of what was Orange County or "Old Augusta". The area was at various times under the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia.) Caspar WENDEROTH raised his family on a farm about five miles south and a little west of present Frederick, Maryland. He died about 1777. Johanes Casper WENDEROTH and wife Anna Margaretha were members of the German Reformed Lutheran Church in Fredericksburg where they baptized some of their children. Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), pp.v.-vii, 1-7.

The original oath of allegiance document, signed by Johann WENDEROTH and forty-one other emigrants on 11 Oct 1732, is preserved in the Pennsylvania Archives at Harrisburg and the complete text is as follows: "We subscribers, natives and late inhabitants of the Palatinate upon the Rhine and places adjacent, having transported ourselves and families into the Province of Pennsylvania, a colony subject to the Crown of Great Britain, in hopes and expectations of finding a retreat and peaceable settlement therein -- Do solemnly promise and engage that we will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his present Majesty, King George the Second and his successors Kings of Great Britain, and will be faithful to the Proprietor of this Province, and that we will demean ourselves peaceably to all his Majesty's subjects, and strictly observe and conform to the Laws of England and of this Province to the utmost of our power and best of our understanding." Prior to about 1735, the settlements on the Monocacy River (near the present sit of Frederick) were the westernmost habitations in Maryland. Only ten miles east of the Blue Ridge foothill 's and directly in the path of westward movement, there were about a half-dozen families settled along the Monacacy by 1732. The settlement grew rapidly; the town of Frederick was laid out in 1745 and the new county of Frederick was created from Prince George County three years later in 1748. The first extant statement concerning the Reformed Congregation at Frederick is that of a minister who visited in 1747, baptizing twenty-six children and organizing support from forty-nine heads of families. In 1767 the Reformed Congregation wrote (in German) a church constitution signed by the members of the community, and among the eighty-nine heads of families is the name "WINTEROTT". - From an outline by Dr. Lyle M. Blackwell of Gauley Bridge, West Virginia.

1733 - Johan Caspar and Margaretha (STREP) WENDERROTH settled for a about two years near New London, Pennsylvania.

Their first child, Anna Maria, was born there on 9 Sept. 1733, and bapt. 20 Sept. 1733, at Trinity Lutheran Church. Sponsor was Anne Marie KELLER, single.

1734 - In 1734, Robert HARPER, a Scotch-Irishman, settled at the junction of the two rivers, Shenandoah and Potomac. Here he established a ferry, which was operated for a number of years, and resulted in the name of the settlement, "Harper's Ferry." That same year, Michael WOODS, a Scottish emigrant from the north of Ireland, passed up the Virginia valley, crossed the Blue Ridge, and settled at Henderson's Quarter, near what has since been called Wood's Gap. Three sons and three sons-in-law came with him. One of the sons-in-law, William WALLACE, settled on Mechum's River, in Albemarle County. About 1735, William HOGE, also Scotch-Irish, removed from Pennsylvania and settled on Opequon Creek, about three miles south of the site of Winchester, Frederick County. Opequon Church was built soon afterwards. Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, pp.44-50.

1734 - Orange County, Virginia was carved out of Spotsylvania County in 1734. It was defined as covering the entire region west of the Blue Ridge, so far as it lay within the boundaries claimed by Virginia.

1735 - James DYER is on a list of Importations to Orange County, Virginia from Great Britain and Ireland in February, 1735. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, p.51.

1735c. Mounce BIRD (1735c.-1793), son of Andrew and Magdelene (Jones) BIRD, was born about 1735. He married Clara RUDDELL, dau. of John RUDDELL. He was a large land owner on Smith's Creek, Shenandoah Co., VA.

1735 - Johann Jacob WENDEROTH (1735-1797), son of Johanes Casper and Margaretha (STREP) WENDEROTH was born 20 Apr 1735 in Frederick (then Prince George County), Maryland. He married Anna Barbara --?--. Jacob was a successful farmer in both Frederick co., Maryland and York Co., Penna. He and his wife, Barbara, ran an Inn-Hotel on their farm about 2 miles southwest of Littlestown, Penna.

1736 - Early in 1736, Benjamin BORDEN (sometimes spelled BURDON), an agent of Lord FAIRFAX, visited John LEWIS and made locations of land in the upper Valley. Soon afterwards, under the condition that BORDON would have one hundred families or settlers located on the land before he received title, Governor GOOCH granted him some five hundred thousand acres, principally along the headwaters of the Shenandoah and James Rivers. Ninety two cabins were erected in two years, and the patent was received, 8 November 1739. Among the first settlers on BORDEN's grant were the family of Ephraim McDOWELL, whom the proprietor had met at the time of his visit to John LEWIS. Ephraim McDOWELL's son, John McDOWELL, was a surveyor, and assisted BORDEN in making his locations. Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, pp.44-50.

1736 - On 6 September 1736, Governor GOOCH issued a patent for the "Manor of Beverly," to William BEVERLEY, John and Richard RANDOLPH, and John  OBINSON. The patent comprised 118,491 acres of land, lying "in the county of Orange (later Augusta County), between the great mountains, on the river Sherando (Shenandoah)." The town of Staunton lies southwest of the center of the grant.

1736 - James PATTON was a very efficient agent of William BEVERLEY and Benjamin BORDEN in aiding them in colonizing their lands. PATTON was a native of Ireland and of Scottish descent. He had served earlier in the British navy; and was owner of a "passenger ship," that traded between Ireland and Hobbes's Hole, Virginia, on the Rappahannock River. He is said to have crossed the Atlantic twenty-five times with cargoes of peltries and tobacco, and then returned with Ulster immigrants. However, by far the greater number of Scotch-Irish emigrants to Virginia came via Pennsylvania and Maryland.

Most of the settlements in the Shenandoah Valley were made up of people who, like John LEWIS, had lived for a season in Pennsylvania, or who had been born there. "They came from Chester, Lancaster, Dauphin, York, Cumberland, Adams, and Franklin Counties in Pennsylvania; from Newcastle county, Delaware; and from Cecil, Harford, Washington, Montgomery, and Frederick counties in Maryland." Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, pp.44-50.

1737 - George BYRD is on a list of importations to Orange County, Va from Great Britain and Ireland in Feb 1737. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, p.50.

1737 - Anna Marie Catherine WENDEROTH, dau. of Johanes Casper WENDEROTH, was born, ca.1737, at Prince George Co., Maryland. She married, 23 July 1761, in the Evangelical Reformed Church of Frederick, Maryland, to John Philip JACOB.

1737 - Johann Martin DIEFENBACHER came to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 15 October 1737, from Amsterdam by way of Cowes, Isle of Wight, in the ship "Townsend", Thomas THOMPSON, master, with 231 immigrants from the Pfalz. They went to Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

1737 - James DYER, Samuel BIRD, Nicholas YEAGER, and Adam YEAGER are included on a list of Tithables in the Precinct of David PHILLIPS, Constable of Orange Co., Virginia in 1737. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, pp.139-140. Note: Johannes JEAGER (1721-1796) is purported to have been the progenitor of the YEAGER family in Rockingham County, Virginia and Highland County. The YEAGER family was associated by marriage to the HULLs and BIRDs. On 10 Apr 1763 Johanne Simon JEAGER and his wife Anna Margaret baptized daughter, Eva born 25 Jan 1763 at Trinity Lutheran Church of Lancaster, Penna. According to one source, the YEAGER and DEVER (Van der Veer) families may have come from the area of Easton, Penna.

1737 - Andrew BIRD was in Augusta Co., Virginia as early as 1737.

1737 - About 1737-38 the churches of Tinkling Spring Church, Augusta Stone Church, and Mossy Creek Church were established, then forming the congregation of the Triple Forks of the Shenandoah, in Augusta County. Shortly thereafter, the congregations of Back Creek in Berkeley county and Forks of James and Timber Ridge in Rockbridge were formed.

1738 - In 1738 that portion of Orange County, Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains was divided into the counties of Frederick and Augusta by a line running from the present northwest corner of Greene County, to the Fairfax Stone at the southern extremity of the western line of Maryland; however "until there should be more settlers west of the mountains, the two new counties were left under the jurisdiction of Orange. It was not until 1745 that Augusta County was organized.

1738 - The portion of Orange County, Virginia west of the Blue Ridge was, in 1738, was set off into the counties of Augusta and Frederick, the line between the two crossing the Shenandoah Valley in the vicinity of Woodstock; however, the machinery of government of Augusta was not organized until 1745. During the interval, Augusta remained attached to the parent county of Orange. "Scotch Irish land-seekers came through Panther Gap and along the upper James and moved up the valleys of the Cowpasture and Jackson's River, until they reached the laurel thickets along the cross-ridges separating the waters of the James from those of the Potomac. German Land-seekers from the opposite direction crept up the three valleys of the South Branch waters until they, too, had come to the divide. --- The Scotch-Irish filled the five valleys which open southward. The Germans occupied Straight Creek and Crabbottom. A few of them made homes south of the divide, and a larger number of the Scotch-Irish settled north of it. When Pendleton County was established in 1787, its southern line followed this water-parting. --- Pendleton was predominantly German. Bath county, soon to be stricken off, was distinctly Scotch Irish." Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.62.

1738 - George STEWART is on a list of importations to Orange County, Va May 1738 from Great Britain and Ireland. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, p.56.

According to C. K. Bolton, among the Ulster immigrants, the GIVENs family came from county Antrim Ireland; the LOCKRIDGEs and PATTONs from county Derry; the STEWARTS from Down; and the BRATTONs and HAMILTONs from Donegal. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.40.

1738 - "Several German families were settled at Winchester (Frederickstown) in 1738. --- Winchester soon had a mixed population of Germans, Irish and a few Scotch and English.

'It was customary for the Dutch on St. Patricks's day,' says Kercheval, 'to exhibit the effigy of the saint, with a string of Irish potatoes around his neck, and his wife Sheeley, with her apron loaded also with potatoes. This was always followed by a riot. The Irish resented the indignity offered to their saint and his holy spouse, and a battle followed. On St. Michael's day the Irish would retort, and exhibit the saint with a rope of sour kraut about the neck. Then the Dutch, like the Yankee, felt chock full of fight, and at it they went, pell mell, and many a black eye, bloody nose and broken head was the result." From John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.X, p.41.

1738 - In 1738, Presbyterian minister, James ANDERSON, was sent as a special delegate from the Synod of Philadelphia, with a message to Governor GOOCH. He visited the   different colonies of Presbyterians in Virginia, and preached his first sermon in Augusta at the hose of John LEWIS. Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, p.49.

1739 - On a list of importations to Orange Co., Va. in Feb 1739 from Ireland is Samuel GIVENS with wife, Sarah, and children: John, Samuel, James, Martha, Elizabeth, William, Margaret, Sarah, and Jane. After the death of Samuel GIVENS in 1741, his widow, Sarah, married Robert ALLEN of Frederick Co., Virginia. Samuel GIVENS' daughter, Elizabeth, married, 1749. to General Andrew LEWIS of present Botetourt Co., Va. He was the commander at the "Battle of Point Pleasant" in which many of the citizens of Bath County, Virginia participated. Descendants of Samuel GIVENS settled in Bath Co., VA and married in to the RIDER and BIRD families. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II,p.52.

1739 - Hester DYER, dau. of Roger and Hannah (BRITTON??) DYER, was born in 1739. She married Matthew PATTON.

A James PATTON, together with John LEWIS and other immigrants from Ulster, Ireland, settled just north of Staunton, (then in Orange County), Virginia as early as 1732. James PATTON and John LEWIS were the first Justices representing Augusta County, ca.1740. James PATTON, "the rich man of the Augusta settlement," is said to have made twenty-five voyages across the Atlantic, bringing immigrants every time. He was county lieutenant and fell in battle in 1755. Morton's ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA p.12,14,53; Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.66.

1739 - Andreas BORT and Anna Barbara KLEIN, Lancaster, Penna., were married, 18 Mar 1739. - Marriage Records of Rev. John Caspar STOEVER.

1739 - William CURRY (ca.1715-1791) married, before 1739, and had children: Susan m. George McAFEE (her 1st cousin); Rebecca, b.1740, m. William McAFEE (bro. of George); James CURRY, b.1746; William CURRY m. Sarah BIGHAM; and John CURRY m. Margaret ADAMS. A ROSTER OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS of the INDIANA DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION , v.2, p.84; D.A.R. #369748.

1739 - John Adam WENDEROTH (1739-1813), son of Johanes Casper WENDEROTH was born, 20 Dec 1739, at Frederick, Maryland. He was a Lt. Col. in the Revolutionary War. He married Anna Marie (HUBER) ZIMMERMAN (1735-1807), dau. of Adam HUBER, a German immigrant. Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), pp.10-11.

1740 - James STUART and Mary DUNAWAY were married, 12 February 1740, at Stafford Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.20, p.18.

1740 - "James Stewart, Jr. was a babe in arms when his parents, James and Anne (LAFFERTY) STEWART, reached the Shenandoah Valley, from Ireland, 1740-1745. He grew up on his father's plantation in Cow Pasture, Augusta Co., Virginia." Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.53.

1740c- "The original suit records in the Clerk's office of Augusta County, show in many instances the place of residence before coming to Virginia. The ALLEN and ANDERSON families of Augusta County, Virginia, came either from Lancaster or Chester county, Penna., and so did the BELL and CURRY families." VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY , v.30, p.181. For further information on the migratory paths from Penna to Augusta Co. and the Shenandoah Valley region see Harrison, J. Houston, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935).

1741 - James LOCKRIDGE, son of William LOCKRIDGE, was baptized, 3 February 1741, at John MOORS in Burdon's Land (Borden Grant). - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1741 - Margaret CURRY, daughter of Nathaniel CURRY, was baptized, 17 May 1741, at Conadogunam. - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1741c- Anna Margaret, dau. of Johanes Caspar WENDEROTH was born about 1741. She was probably the Susanna Margaret WINTROW who married, 1767, to John BIRD and lived in what is now Highland County, Virginia, during the period 1780-1819. Susanna WENDEROTH attended the Evangelical Reformed Church in Frederick, Maryland. The Church recorded dates of attendance and her age. See Blackwell, Lyle M., MY FATHERS (1979), pp.55-63; Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.11,78; Oren F. Morton, HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA , pp.264-267.

1741 - Peter Thomas HOHL is listed among the Palatine men on board the "Francis and Ann" (Thomas COATAM, Master) from Rotterdam, Holland, by way of St. Christopher, Leeward Islands, to Philadelphia, Penna., 30 May 1741. He settled in Lancaster, PA., later at Rockingham Co., Virginia; thence to Augusta Co. (Rockingham Co.); married, 1750, Susannah Margareta DIEFENBACH, daughter of Johann Martin and Elizabeth (SPIESS) DIEFENBACH. Peter Thomas HOHL died in 1776. See Virkus's ABRIDGED COMPENDIUM OF AMERICAN GENEALOGY , p.565; Cleek, Geo. W., EARLY WESTERN AUGUSTA PIONEERS , pp.369-386; Rupp, Daniel I., THIRTY THOUSAND NAMES OF GERMAN, SWISS, DUTCH AND FRENCH IMMIGRANTS , p.145; PENNSYLVANIA ARCHIVES , Second Series, V.I, p.207.

1741 - Maria Barbara BORT, dau. of Andreas and Barbara (KLEIN) BORT was born 20 July 1741, and baptized 28 Nov 1741. - Baptismal records of Rev. John Caspar STOEVER.

1741 - "26th Feb. 1741 - On the petition of Alexander THOMPSON and others for a road or bridleway the convenientest Way from Jackson's Mill over the ridge by the way of Swift run gap Yts ordered that Jacob DYER, James BARTON, Jacob CASSELL and James DYER or any two or more of them mark view and lay off a road and make return of their proceedings to ye next court." Orange County Order Book, 1741-43, p.109; J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.140.

1741 - Mary RALSTON, daughter of Robert RALSTON was bapt., 8 March 1741. Ruth RALSTON, daughter of Robert RALSTON was bapt., 27 June 1742. Robert, son of Robert RALSTON, was baptized, 20 August 1744. Agness, dau. of Robert RALSTON, was baptized, 20 May 1746.

Elizabeth, dau. of Robert RALSTON, was baptized, 12 June 1748.

James BRATTAN, son of Robert BRATTAN was baptized, 11 March 1749, on the Calf Pasture.

"Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1742c- Jacob RIDER, born c.174?, of Virginia, a native of Germany; came to America before the Revolution and settled in Virginia. He had a large family, and was one of the   early settlers of the Shenandoah Valley. See: Perrin, W.H., HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY, OHIO , p.993.

1742 - Henry PATTON, son of James PATTON, was baptized, 20 January 1742. - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1742 - The father of Colonel John DICKENSON who married Martha USHER, daughter of Edward USHER, was Adam DICKENSON, a leading pioneer on the lower Cowpasture River. He was living at Hanover, New Jersey in 1733. In 1742, he was an Ironworker in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, but seems to have moved in the same year to Prince George County, Maryland. It was there, in 1742, that he entered into a bond in favor of Thomas LINDSAY, whereby he was to patent 1,000 acres on Clover Creek, "otherwise ye Cow Pasture"; and place two families on the tract. Four years later, after removing to the Cowpasture, he brought suit against Roger HUNT, LINDSAY's assignee, for a failure to comply with the contract. Adam DICKENSON was appointed one of 21 justices in the first Augusta county court in 1745; and he alone represented the portion of the county west of Shenandoah Mountain. His grist-mill, licensed 12 February 1747, was the first in the region of Bath County; and the church built on his homestead was probably the first house of worship among the southern Alleghenies. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.38-39,52-53.

1742 - "Robert CURRY, a surgeon, was of Scotch-Irish descent, and came to Virginia and patented lands in Augusta county as early as 1742. He led the first company from the upper part of the valley against the French in the Ohio Valley, at a date anterior to Braddock's defeat. He had a family of six sons and two daughter, the sons famed as fearless in border warfare. His son Samuel, grandfather of Dr. James S. CURRY, inherited the family estate, and married Mary GLENN by whom were born to him seven daughters and two sons. One of the later, Robert A. CURRY, inherited the family homestead, where he was born Sept. 25, 1809, and he married Hannah ANDERSON, who was born near Raleigh Springs, Rockingham county. --- James Samuel CURRY was their first born, April 16, 1837 near Fort Defiance, Augusta county, and he married 6 OCT 1880 in Grant County, West Va. to Mollie J. HARMAN, and had two daughters, Anna Myrtle and Lelia Mabel." Mollie (HARMAN) CURRY was g-g-granddaughter of Mary DYER who, at "twelve years of age, was among those made captive (by the Indians), and remained captive with the Indians three years. From ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA PERSONALS (1884), "Dr. James Samuel CURRY", p.14.

1742 - Valentine SEVIER is on a list of importations to Orange County, Va. from Great Britain and Ireland May 1742. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, p.56.

Valentine SEVIER was of French Huguenot ancestry. He was born in London and came in youth (with brother William) to Baltimore, Md., abt. 1740, settled first in Orange Co., Va. and then in Augusta (now Rockingham) Co., Va. (near present NewMarket) where he farmed and traded with the Indians. He married Miss Joanna GOADE. His son, Gov. John SEVIER, born in Augusta co., 23 Sept. 1745, lived in what is now Bath County, Va. He was a Colonel in the King's Mountain Battle and also served in the Battle of Point Pleasant. See Edmund James Cleveland, CLEVELAND GENEALOGY , v.3,p.2114n.

1742 - Andrew BURD was a "Lieutenant of Foot" under Col. BEVERLY, in Captain Peter SCHOWLL's company, Orange County (later Augusta County) Militia, in 1742. Peter SCHOLL's Militia company was made up of inhabitants in the vicinity of Smiths Creek on the West side of North Mountain. Others who served in this Militia company were Math SKEENS, John HARRISON, Zebulon HARRISON, Thomas MOORE, Valentine SEVIER, John WHITE, Robert CALDWELL, et.al. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.126,143; Chalkey, v.II, p.509; Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, p.58.

1742 - "In 1742, a Militia was formed in Augusta County, and all men regardless of age were enrolled. In this Militia with James STEWART, was Henry MURRAY, John HAMILTON, Ralph LAFFERTY, Alexander WALKER, William and James McCUTCHEON, and Robert STEWART (son of James STEWART)" Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.27; Hening's Statutes, pp.64-65.

1743 - On 29 October 1743, there was an order of council, in favor of Henry ROBINSON, James WOOD and Thomas and Andrew LEWIS for 30,000 acres between the James and Cow Pasture   Rivers. Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.61-62; Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.26.

1743 - A John Balthazar DIEFENBACH was born in Alsace-Lorraine in 1743; came to America in 1764; and died in Virginia in 1820. He had a son, Henry.

1743 - A Conrad DIEFFENBACHER (1743-1813) was born 1 March 1743, at Eppingen, Germany. He married, 30 January 1769, Montgomery Co., Penna., to Catherine BETTS (1749-1809). They had children: Abraham; John; Frederick; Jacob; Philip; Henry married Suzanna HILL; Elizabeth; Conrad; Catherine; David; June; and Susannah. A ROSTER OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS OF THE INDIANA DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION , v.1, p.173; D.A.R. #585140.

1743 - Johan George Franz WINTEROTH (1743-1809), son of Johanes Caspar WENDEROTH was born, 5 Nov 1743, and baptized, 11 Mar 1744, at the Evangelical Reformed Church at Frederick, Md. He married Susanna --?--.

1744 - Lieut Andrew BIRD was commissioned Captain, 28 February 1744. Harrison relates the tradition that two BYRD brothers from the James River started on a trip north and in passing through the Shenandoah Valley decided to make their home there. Orange Court Order Book, 1743-46, p.269; J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.144.

1744 - James DYER, son of Roger and Hannah (BRITTON??) DYER, was born in 1744.

1744 - Colonel William BYRD II (1674-1744), of "Westover," Charles City Co., Virginia, died 26 August 1744. Weis, Frederick Lewis, THE MAGNA CHARTA SURETIES, 1215 (3rd edition 1979); Lineage #47, p.38.

1744 - Rosanna, daughter of Thomas BERD, was baptized, 29 July 1744, near North Mountain, Augusta County, Virginia. "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1744 - In 1744 a Warrant was granted to Caspar WENDEROTH of Price George County, Md., for fifty acres of land, he having paid fifty Shillings Sterling. He received Warrants for another 70 acres additional in 1745. This estate was referred to as "Wolf Pit Acres". The land was located about four miles southwest of Frederic town, and was along Baltis Fouts run (now Ballinger Creek). Annapolis Hall of Records, LGD 1742-1745, p.272,514; Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.6.

1745 - Anna Mary, dau. of Johanes Caspar WENDEROTH was born about 1745.

1745 - By 1745-47, "Presbyterian communities of Scotch-Irish origin were settled at Falling Waters, in Berkeley county; Elk Branch and Bullskin in Jefferson county; Peaked Mountain in Rockingham county; North Mountain, Cow Pasture, and Calf Pasture in Augusta county; New Providence in Rockbridge county; and Roanoke in Botetourt." Charles H. Hanna, THE SCOTCH-IRISH FAMILIES OF AMERICA , v.2, pp.44-50.

1745 - Lord Thomas FAIRFAX, born Kent, England, 1693, died Greenway Court, Frederick County, Virginia, 1781, was educated at Oxford University. From his maternal grandfather, Thomas CULPEPER, he inherited estates in the Northern Neck of Virginia comprising more than 5 million acres between the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. He visited the property during 1735-1737 and took up

permanent residence in 1747. The estates were managed by his cousin, William FAIRFAX, whose daughter, Anne, was married to Lawrence WASHINGTON, elder brother of George WASHINGTON. ENCYCLOPEDIA AMERICANA (International Edition, 1965), v.10, p.719. William FAIRFAX, bapt. Newton-Kyme, England, 30 Oct. 1691, died 3 Sept. 1757, of "Belvoir," Virginia, was son of Henry and Ann (HARRISON) FAIRFAX, and grandson of Richard HARRISON. William FAIRFAX was President of the Council of Virginia. Weis, Frederick Lewis, THE MAGNA CHARTA SURETIES, 1215 (3rd edition 1979); Lineage 76, p.54.

In 1745 the King designated the western boundary line to the dominion of Lord Thomas FAIRFAX as an imaginary line from the head waters of the Potomac to Conway River, a branch of the Rapidan. The Conway River is the next stream north of Swift Run Gap and is now the dividing line between Greene and Madison Counties, Virginia. In 1746 a commission of six men was appointed to definitely establish the Fairfax line. Members of this committee were Colonel William BYRD III, of Westover, John ROBINSON, John GRYMES, Thomas LEWIS, Robert BROOKS, and Geo. Wm. FAIRFAX. Harry M. Strickler, MASSANUTTEN (Reprinted 1978), p.93.

1745 - On 11 Feb 1745, Ann Jenny USHER came into Court and chose James KNOX her guardian, who and with John BROWN and Andrew PICKENS, his security, acknowledged a Bond for the settlement of the estate of her deceased father. It was the first fiduciary bond recorded in Augusta County. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.406-407.

1745 - Archibald STUART, son of Thomas STUART, was baptized, 12 Feb. 1745. Jennet, daughter of Thomas STUART, was baptized, 22 February 1747.

Ann, daughter of Thomas STUART, was baptized, 29 January 1749. "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1745 - On 2 April 1745, deeds for 2247 acres in the Calfpasture Valley were given by James PATTON and John LEWIS to William CAMPBELL, Jacob CLEMENS, Samuel HODGE, Robert GAY, Thomas GILLAM and William JAMISON. On 17 August 1745, other deeds for 5,205 acres were given by the same men to Francis DONALLY, Robert GWIN, Robert BRATTON, John DUNLAP, Loftus PULLIN, John WILSON, John KINCAID, John MILLER, Robert GAY, and James CARTER. - Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.64.

1745 - James PATTON and John BUCHANNAN laid out the famous "Indian Road" up the Valley of Virginia, and in the May 1745 Court at Orange County, Virginia, its construction was ordered. Samuel STUART, John HARRISON, Captain Daniel HARRISON, Robert CREAM, William THOMPSON and John STEVENTS were assigned as overseers of the stretch from Frederick County Line to Callwell's Path, across Beard's Ford on the North River to Alexander Thompson's Ford on the Middle River to Tinkling Springs. Rev. Ulysses S. A. Heavener, GERMAN NEW RIVER SETTLEMENT: VIRGINIA (1976 Reprint), p.13.

1745 - In the fall of 1745, Thomas and Andrew LEWIS surveyed tracts on the Cowpasture River, to Adam DICKENSON, Alexander MILLROY, John DONALLY, Hugh COFFEY, James WADDELL, Ralph LAVERTY, James STEUART, James McCAY, John MITCHELL, John CARTMILL, and James HUGHART and others.

James STEUART gave his name to the stream first known as Stuart's Mill Creek. He was probably a brother-in-law to Ralph LAVERTY, and was killed by Indians in 1757. James STEUART, Ralph STEUART, and John STEUART were then minor children. James STEUART and Ralph STEUART went to Tygart's Valley, where the former died in 1777, probably while in militia service. Robert STEUART, who was living on the patent in 1789 and keeping a store, was probably the oldest son. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.16,200.

1746 - Elizabeth, daughter of David STEWART was baptized, 12 Aug. 1746.

John, son of Andrew LEWIS, was baptized, 14 Sept. 1746.

David STEWART, "Adult," was baptized, 21 January 1747.

Samuel, son of Andrew LEWIS, was baptized, 18 Sept., 1748.

John, son of David STUART, was baptized, 3 May 1749.

"Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1746 - James and John DIVER, sons, "not twins" of Hugh DIVER (DEAVER?) were both baptized, 22 May 1746. - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1746 - Lieut. Andrew BIRD (or BYRD) and Thomas MOORE, were in the region between John HARRISON Sr. and the Fairfax line, in 1746. In fact their lands were about midway of this region---or some three or four miles north of the "Big Spring." Here were also located Valentine SEVIER and Daniel DAVISON. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.143-144.

1746 - James CURRY, son of William CURRY, was baptized, August 1746. - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1746 - Johannes HOHL (c.1685-c.1746) died in Germany before 6, Jan 1747, at which time records show his wife to be a widow. In 1748 the widow HOHL went with Johann Tobias HOHL and his family "from Bad Kreuznach to Meisenheim am Glan and (descendants are) still living there. Johannes HOHL was a burger and a 'Commissariat-rider' at Bad Kreuznach. His duty was to ride into the countryside to find supplies for the city in time of trouble." - THE HFA JOURNAL (Hull Family Association, August 1990), v.1, No.2, pp.1-10.

1747 - Agness, daughter of William BERD, was baptized, 24 May 1747.

"Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1747 - Roger DYER came from Penna. to Fort Seybert in 1747 and was the leader of the first settlement in Pendleton Co., VA. He first located near Moorefield, but finding the damp bottom land to be malarious, moved higher up the valley in what is now Pendleton County, West Virginia. He bought land on 5 Nov 1747 from Robert GREEN. According to Morton, he married Hannah BRITTON?? He had children: William DYER m. Margaret DUNKLE; Hannah DYER m. Frederick KIESTER; Hester DYER m. Matthew PATTON; Sarah "Mary" DYER m. (1) Peter HAWES and (2) Robert DAVIS; James DYER m. (1) Anne --?-- and (2) Jan RALSTON; and Roger DYER, Jr. m. Margaret DINWIDDIE. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.357,360; Cleek, Geo. W., EARLY WESTERN AUGUSTA PIONEERS , pp.350-353; Henings' STATUTES , v.7,pp.182,185.

Note: There was a Quaker DYER family associated with the BRITTON family in Bucks County, Pa and Sussex County, (NJ?). Louis DENNIS, husband of Mary (DYER) DENNIS, bought of Joseph BRITTON, miller, the mill and land in Hardyston, Sussex Co., (Hardystonville) 15 Apr 1797, and sold it to John CRAWFORD five days later. This "Mary (DYER) DENNIS" was dau. of James and Elizabeth (ATKINSON) DYER and granddaughter of Josiah and Rachel (SCHOOLEY) DYER. Josiah DYER's father, John DYER, "a preacher among Friends" came from England about 1700 and settled in Doylestown, Bucks County, Penna. in 1701. See Stickney's DENNISANIA (1904), pp.43-44; HACKETTSTOWN GAZETTE (1934-35), Series on "Pioneer Families of Northwestern New Jersey", Article 34 and 67. Clippings at Minnesota Historical Society Library Cat # F133 f.P66.

1748 - Henry PATTON, son of Henry PATTON, was baptized, 6 March 1748. - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1748 - Rebecca CURRY, daughter of William CURRY, was baptized, 24 April 1748. - "Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1748 - Adam SCHNEIDER and Anna Marie BORT, Lebanon, Penna, were married 21 June 1748. - Marriage Records of Rev. John Caspar STOEVER.

1748 - Jacob DYER, farmer, and wife Mary, on 29 July 1748, sold a tract of land on Muddy Creek, (in present Rockingham County, Virginia), "corner Daniel HARRISON, Wm. WHITE, Wm. CARROLL," to Ephraim LOVE "late of Lancaster County., Pennsylvania." J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.197; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.70.

1748 - Adam RADER was a settler near Timberville, Virginia in 1748. It was here that the Moravians, Joseph SPANGENBERG and Matthew REUTZ stopped, 27 July 1748, on their journey to Massanutten. VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , Vol.XI, No.3, p.240;

John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.110.

1748 - Archibald STEUART was a member of the Tinkling Spring Presbyterian Church. Rev. John CRAIG was the first minister in 1748. Archibald STEUART and wife are supposedly buried about 2 miles north of the home of Irene Bogan, near Staunton, VA. - Information from Irene Bogan in 1978.

1748 - A petition for a road from the "lower end of the Cowpasture to Carter's mill" on the Calfpasture was rejected in February 1748, but granted a month later. Signers included James STUART, Adam DICKENSON, Ralph LAVERTY, John MOORE, et.al. These people were living above and below Fort Dickenson, and on Stuart's Creek. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.58.

1748 - John HAMILTON (1713-1814), married, ca.1748, to Mary STEUART (ca.1732-1812). They both died in Bath County, Kentucky. The HAMILTON's (Abner and John) probably left Tygert's Valley in Virginia for Kentucky about 1797. -   Information from a descendant, Joanne Sullivan, Oklahoma City, OK.

1748 - David STUART sold 57 acres of land in Beverly Manor, adjoining John MILLER in Augusta County, Virginia, 19 August 1748, to James MILLER. Augusta Co. Deeds, Bk.2, pp.4-7,70-73; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.70-71.

1748 - "From VIRGINIA VALLEY RECORDS concerning the CURRY and allied families: In 1748 Dr. Robert CURRY settled in Augusta Co., Va. and his brothers, Nathan, David & Isaiah came at about the same time to the valley from Lancaster Co., PA. Then there is a paragraph that ties Isaiah CURRY to James CURRY." Information from Mavis SMITH of Fremont, Calif., a descendant of Robert and Phebe (SAMPLE) CURRY.

1748 - According to Vern Carpenter in his WENDEROTH FAMILIES , Caspar WENDEROTH was on a "Black List" in 1748.

Apparently a crooked Sheriff and some other officers forced the farmers in Frederick to pay their yearly rents and taxes more than once and added "penalties". For a period prior to 1750, the area was taxed by both Pennsylvania and Maryland. Caspar and several other farmers, paid their land rent under protest.

1749 - Ann, daughter of Thomas BERD, was baptized, 25 February 1749, at North Mountain, Augusta Co., Virginia.

Margaret, daughter of William BERD, was baptized, 16 May 1749.

"Records of Baptisms by the Rev. John Craig, D.D., 1740-49, Pastor of Augusta Church," as published in Florence Wilson Houston's MAXWELL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY (1916), pp.575-597.

1749 - Epraim VAUSE sold 248 acres on th S. Branch of "Roanoke," to William McCURRY, 27 Feb. 1749. Augusta Co., Virginia Deeds, Bk.2, pp.502-505; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.71.

1749 - Thomas HARRISON, Robert CRAVENS, and Jeremiah HARRISON were appointed to appraise the estate of Peter DYER deceased. Their appraisal was recorded in Augusta County, 15 May 1749 (Will Book 1, p.174). "Jacob and James DYER are mentioned on the Orange County records as early as 1741. Peter was probably a brother." J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), pp.221-222.

1749 - A Phillip Thomas HULL is on the passenger list of the ship "Christian" arriving from Holland at Philadelphia, Sept 1749.

1749 - James BIRD is on a list of importations to Orange County, Va from Great Britain and Ireland in March 1749. Brockman, William Everet ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA FAMILIES , v.II, p.50

1749 - In 1749, Andrew BYRD patented land on Smith's Creek, in the portion of Shenandoah Co., VA that now is in Rockingham Co., VA. For some descendants see John W. Wayland, HISTORY OF SHENANDOAH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp. 691-693.

1749 - Johann Peter WINTEROTH, son of Johanes Caspar and Anna Margaretha WENDEROTH, was baptized, 5 July 1749, at Frederick Co., Maryland. He married to Anna Maria MICHAEL, bapt. 23 Aug. 1752, dau. of Christopher and Catherine MICHAEL. He removed, first, ca.1779, to Washington Co., Penna. and then, ca. 1802, to Warren Co., Ohio, where he died.